Republicans Vote Against Protecting 2.7 Million Tennesseans Living with Pre-Existing Conditions

Republicans Vote Against Protecting 2.7 Million Tennesseans Living with Pre-Existing Conditions

Corker, Alexander Wrong on Baldwin Resolution

Blackburn Still Refusing to Sign Onto Rosen Resolution

 

Nashville, TN – Congressional Republicans have once again refused to stand up and protect Tennesseans with pre-existing conditions.

Yesterday, Senators Bob Corker and Lamar Alexander voted against Senator Tammy Baldwin (D-WI)’s discharge petition to force a vote on her resolution to block insurers from selling the Trump Administration's short-term, junk insurance plans.

Meanwhile, Congressman Marsha Blackburn has still not signed on to Congresswoman Jacky Rosen’s resolution that would authorize the House’s legal counsel to go to court and defend our health care law and protections for people with pre-existing conditions against the Texas v. Azar lawsuit.

Sen. Corker, Sen. Alexander, and Rep. Blackburn’s refusal to stand up for those with pre-existing conditions shows us where they really stand, even if they claim to support protections for pre-existing conditions. It’s time for them to stop playing partisan politics with the lives of Tennesseans.

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Background Information

Corker, Alexander, and Blackburn Are Neglecting Tennesseans with Pre-existing Conditions

As Many As 130 Million Nonelderly Americans Have A Pre-Existing Condition. This includes 2,718,800 Tennesseans. [Center for American Progress, 4/5/17]

Short-Term Plans May Exclude Coverage For Pre-Existing Conditions. “Policyholders who get sick may be investigated by the insurer to determine whether the newly-diagnosed condition could be considered pre-existing and so excluded from coverage.” [Kaiser Family Foundation, 2/9/18]

Junk Plans Mean Higher Premiums For People With Pre-Existing Conditions. "By promoting short-term policies, the administration is making a trade-off: lower premiums and less coverage for healthy people, and higher premiums for people with preexisting conditions who need more comprehensive coverage." [Washington Post, 5/1/18]